Yukima

Calligrapher, Les Ateliers de Japon

Yukima is a calligrapher and one of the founding members of Les Ateliers de Japon.
Born in Kyoto, formerly the Imperial capital of Japan for more than 1,000 years, she started practicing calligraphy at age eight. After graduating high school she moved to Osaka to pursue her calling to be a professional calligrapher.
Her work showcases the beauty and tranquility of Japanese calligraphy, shodō, with a big message for the world. Yukima is especially known for minute brushwork.

Yukima Tanaka

Caligrapher, Les Ateliers de Japon

Yukima is a calligrapher and one of the founding members of Les Ateliers de Japon.
Born in Kyoto, formerly the Imperial capital of Japan for more than 1,000 years, she started practicing calligraphy at age eight. After graduating high school she moved to Osaka to pursue her calling to be a professional calligrapher.
Her work showcases the beauty and tranquility of Japanese calligraphy, shodō, with a big message for the world. Yukima is especially known for minute brushwork.

Tools of Japanese Calligraphy

Examples of necessary tools for calligraphy are ink, brush, paper, stamp seal, and paperweight.

The ink is the hardened mixture of vegetable or pine soot and glue in the shape of a stick called sumi. The ink is ground upon a suzuri, a type of palette for the ink and mixed with water. The suzuri is usually made of stone or pottery, and the ink will pool at the bottom.

A brush (fude) is made from the hair of horses or sheep, attached to the end of a wooden stick or bamboo shoot. There are many different sizes of brushes to be used depending upon the type or size of letters you will write. The paper (hanshi) used is specially made for just calligraphy. It is thin but doesn't allow the ink to bleed through. A paper-weight (bunchin) is used to hold the paper down and keep it from twisting or shifting when writing. Finally, a stamp seal is pressed upon the left side or bottom of the paper to prove the authenticity of the work.